Pride 2019 Recap

A group of about 20 people walking down a street holding signs and flags. People at the front of the group are holding a banner with the TAAAP logo and the words "The Ace and Aro Advocacy Project."

TAAAP was thrilled to participate in a number of different pride events this June. Attending pride events and representing asexuality and aromanticism helps us to spread awareness of our identities and connect with the larger LGBTQ+ community.

Capital Pride Parade in Washington, D.C.

A group of 15 people pose with a variety of flags and signs behind a banner that has the TAAAP logo and the words "The Ace and Aro Advocacy Project, taaap.org"
TAAAP’s contingent waiting to march at the Capital Pride Parade.

On Saturday, June 8th, we marched in the Capital Pride Parade for the second time. About 20 marchers joined us decked out in ace colors, aro colors, and more. Thanks to a generous donation from Asexuality Archive, we were able to fly full-size greyromantic, demiromantic, grey-asexual, and demisexual flags in addition to the aromantic and asexual flags. We passed out stickers that said “LGBTQIA: the A stands for Asexual, Aromantic, Agender,” and enjoyed meeting aces and aros on the sidelines.

A square image with a green, grey, and purple border and a white center. The text in the center says "LGBTQIA: the A stands for Asexual, Aromantic, Agender." The text on the border says TAAAP.ORG.
The sticker TAAAP passed out at Capital Pride.

Baltimore Pride Parade

A black woman holds an ace flag in one hand and the TAAAP banner in the other hand. Behind her there are other marchers holding a variety of flags and signs.
TAAAP marching in the Baltimore Pride Parade.

On Saturday, June 15th, we marched in the Baltimore Pride Parade for the first time. We had about 10 marchers in our contingent wearing their most ace and aro attire. The Baltimore Pride Parade felt very community-driven, and we really enjoyed our time there.

Northern Maryland Pride

Four people pose outdoors in front of an ace flag. There is a leather flag in the background.
(From left to right) Skyler, Emily, Tori, and Isabel at the Frederick Pride Festival

Several of our members took a road trip up to northern Maryland on Saturday, June 22nd. The first stop was the Frederick Pride Festival. Next, we were pleased to be able to attend the first annual Upper Chesapeake Bay Pride Festival.

WorldPride in New York City

Five people standing in front of the conference schedule poster, holding the asexual, aromantic, and genderqueer flags.
(From left to right) Isabel, Laura, Alex, Axel, and Mykie at the Human Rights Conference

A few of our members attended events in New York City for WorldPride. At the Human Rights Conference on Tuesday, June 25th, we participated on a panel on Overlooked Identities in the Queer Community. Later that week, we were able to attend the premiere screening of the upcoming Asexuals documentary.

Four people pose in front of a building.
(From left to right) Laura, Emily, Steph, and Anzo outside the Grace Institute after the Ace & Aro Conference

On Saturday, June 29th, we attended the Ace & Aro Conference hosted by Aces NYC and AVEN. Asexuality conferences have been a part of WorldPride since it was hosted by London in 2012; however this was the first conference that was also dedicated to aromanticism. The Ace & Aro Conference featured a number of guest speakers as well as unconference-style sessions that allowed attendees to create sessions that best fit what they wanted to attend.

A person wearing a baseball hat and a green shirt with facepaint that says NYC over a rainbow in ace flag colors.
Emily at the NYC Pride March

Last but certainly not least, we attended the NYC Pride March on Sunday, June 30th as a part of the Aces NYC marching contingent. About 80 people marched, and we encountered many other aces and aros in the crowds.

The Relationship Between the Aro and Ace Communities – Call for Submissions

We would like to invite any and all people who identify on the aromantic spectrum, asexual spectrum, or both to write a blog post on the topic, “The Relationship Between the Aro and Ace Communities.” This will be a joint blogging event between the Carnival of Aros and the Carnival of Aces, and all posts are due by the end of February. Please read on to learn more.

What is the Carnival of Aces?

The “Carnival of Aces” has been around since 2011. For those who don’t know, this is a monthly event where different bloggers come together to all post about a single topic. Each month, a new blog hosts the carnival, or in other words, they pick the topic, post a call for submissions, and post a round-up of all the different posts published on the topic during the month. To read more about the Carnival of Aces and read past carnivals, click here.

What is the Carnival of Aros?

This is the first month of the Carnival of Aros. The goal is for this to become a sibling event to the Carnival of Aces that seeks to encourage blogging on aromanticism. As this is just the first month, specific details on how the Carnival of Aros will proceed are still being worked out. Please read here for more information on the Carnival of Aros and what you can do to support it.

Why did we choose this topic?

The aro and ace communities are inextricably linked by their shared history and by the fact that many people identify as both aro and ace. Recently, however, the aro community has begun building its own separate structure, and there have been resulting growing pains in both communities.

We hope that by having an open and constructive discussion on the relationship between our communities, we can learn new ways to better support each other.

Prompts

The following are meant to give you ideas for what you can write about, but posts are not limited to these prompts! The topic is meant to be broad, so feel free to write about whatever you are inspired to write about. Additionally, other mediums (such as vlogging) are always welcome!

  • The similarities and differences between aro and ace communities or identities
  • The history of aro and ace communities and terminology
  • Experiences relating to being either aro or ace, but not both
  • Experiences relating to being both aro and ace
  • How you feel about the split attraction model (that is, the separation of romantic and sexual attraction)
  • What it means to be an ally to aros as an ace person, or vice versa
  • Your hopes on the future of the relationship between the two communities
  • The disparity of resources and in-person communities between the aro and ace communities, and what we can do about it
  • How the general public confuses and conflates aromanticism and asexuality
  • Thoughts on the start of the Carnival of Aros
  • The relationship between the aro or ace community and another LGBTQ+ community

Who can submit?

Anyone who identifies on the asexual spectrum, the aromantic spectrum, or both. We would like to specifically welcome aros who are not also ace to post as well.

How to submit:

Option one: Post your submission to your own blog and send us the link as a comment on our WordPress blog or by email to advocacy@taaap.org.

Option two: If you would like to remain anonymous or you do not have your own blog, we will host guest submissions on our blog if you email us at advocacy@taaap.org.

All posts must be submitted by the end of the day on February 28th in order to be included in the round-up post for the month, which will be posted on March 1st.

Community Highlight: The Ace Community Survey

Community of Interest: The Ace Community

What they do

Every year during Asexual Awareness Week, the Ace Community Survey team releases a new survey designed to gather data on the ace community. The 2014 census collected upwards of ten thousand responses, and the Ace Community Surveys are the largest existing data pools on asexuality. Please visit their website to learn more and to read past survey results.

Why they are awesome

Asexuality can be tricky to research. People identify as asexual for a variety of reasons, and there are plenty of related issues that can be very complex, such as romantic orientation, attitudes towards sex, etc. It is very difficult to gather concrete data about these topics in a way that does not alienate some aces.

We highly recommend that anyone working on any type of research project that is gathering data on aces (or aros!) closely study the survey questions and results. Paying special attention to what changed from year to year will help you gain an understanding of what works and doesn’t work when gathering data on our communities.

How you can support them

Take the 2018 Ace Community Survey! Anyone age 13 and up can take the survey — whether they are on the asexual spectrum or not. The survey will close on November 15th. In addition, you can subscribe to survey updates in order to be notified when new surveys and analyses of the results are available. If you are interested in more involvement, the survey team is currently looking for volunteers, particularly those skilled in data analysis, coding, and translation.